"Wolf Eye Sly" has hit the Amazon best seller list!
 
 
I am having a double celebration! As I hit 16K followers on Twitter, WOLF EYE ALIBI, my stand-alone romantic comedy in the continuing saga of the wicked little town of Wolf Eye, is LIVE 7/07/2015! Can life get any sweeter? I am overwhelmed by all the comments of excitement and requests for signed copies. The paperback is still in the works and I will announce when it is available. The Kindle version can be found here. http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01154TC2G.
 

WOLF EYE SLY

06/02/2015

 
The setting for Wolf Eye Sly is a fictional lighthouse on the shores of Lake Superior in Michigan's beautiful Upper Peninsula. The lighthouse was named from an American Indian legend that likened the beacon in the night to the gleam of a wolf's eye. A small nearby town sprang up in the 1800's and took its name from the lighthouse. Wolf Eye is a setting with beautiful panoramic views, eccentric townsfolk, and a rich history. This fictional little town was crying to be the scene of a romantic comedy series.
 
 
Oh, yes, I've been quiet. Truth is, I've been writing WOLF EYE ALIBI, the sequel to WOLF EYE SLY and book two in my Wolf Eye Lighthouse contemporary romance series. Release date announcement soon!
 

Firecracker Sunset

05/31/2015

 
Sometimes all you can do is stop and stare.
 
 
The Big Sable Point Lighthouse is located on the eastern shore of Lake Michigan near Ludington, Michigan. It is located upon a spectacular sand bluff with a panoramic view of the Great Lake, and is an especially wonderful location to watch the sunset.


Called Grande Point au Sable by French explorers and traders, Big Sable Point was an important landmark for mariners traveling a treacherous stretch of Lake Michigan shoreline between Big Sable Point and present day Ludington. In 1855 twelve ships wrecked in that area. Commerce linked to the lumber industry required that Big Sable Point be suitably lighted so in 1867 the Big Sable Point lighthouse was built. As lumbering waned, steamers carrying coal, agriculture products, and tourists continued to rely on the lighthouse for navigation.

The Big Sable Point Lighthouse tower is 112 feet high and is one of the few lighthouses in Michigan with a tower reaching over 100 feet. In 1902 the deteriorating brick tower was encased in steel. The keeper's dwelling, which once housed a single family, has been enlarged over the years to the present three family residence. Indoor plumbing and heating and a diesel electric generator were added in 1949. In 1953 power lines were extended to the Point. In 1968 the station was fully automated and a lighthouse keeper was no longer needed. Big Sable Point Light Station is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.



To reach the Big Sable Point Lighthouse, take Highway M-116 north from Ludington to Lakeshore Drive, and then proceed 6.5 miles and enter Ludington State Park. The 1.5 mile well-maintained walking trail through sand dunes is picturesque and well worth the trek. Go at sunset and take your camera!
 
 
A writer friend of mine recently mentioned she writes when she is either extremely sad or extremely happy. I thought about that a while and wondered why it is different for me. I am least likely to write when I am very happy or sad. For me, I need my "writer's zen."

Urban Dictionary defines zen as "A state of focus that incorporates a total togetherness of body and mind. Zen is a way of being. It also is a state of mind. Zen involves dropping illusion and seeing things without distortion created by your own thoughts."

When I am euphoric or unhappy I am too distracted to create romantic fiction. I am most likely to write my style of romantic comedy when I feel serene. Give me windless skies and still waters. Let me drift peacefully and dream. 

Let me reflect upon a sea of tranquility and I will produce for you a story worth telling.

 
 
Last night I went to the Manistee, Michigan, USA, to watch the sunset. Manistee is on the shores of Lake Michigan, and it has a picturesque lighthouse. After several days in a row of cool temperatures and rain, fickle Michigan weather had finally coughed up 70 degrees, and I was eager to enjoy a Great Lakes beach.

The skies were blue with barely a cloud, and in my experience clouds are usually what I need for sunset photography to have a lot of visual impact. But this sunset surprised me. The skies turned golden, and as the sun dropped below the horizon it was a massive red ball. Amber tones quickly morphed to reds, pinks, and purples. I snapped away, not wanting to miss a single Pure Michigan view.


It was later when I looked over the photos on my computer that I realized just what an array of colors this one sunset had. Who would believe the pastels pinks and blues of the final photos are the same location as the deep golden tones in the first?

And I knew, once again, this is why I am addicted to photography, for someone has to record these magic moments.

 

Love on the Beach

07/16/2014

 
I didn't see it at first.

There I stood, high on a Lake Michigan bluff somewhere north of Saugatuk, Michigan, gazing out at a spectacular Great Lakes sunset. It was that magic moment that is the subject of countless forms of art and poetry. The weather was a perfect 70 degrees. The breeze was mild. 


I am a photographer and a romance novelist, so as I stood on that platform upon a massive dune my artistic side was taking in the larger picture. I scanned the horizon. There was blue sky and fresh water as far as I could see. I glanced up and down the pristine beach. There were many footprints in the sand, but miraculously I was alone.

I still did not see it.

Glad I had brought my Nikon, I snapped a few photos and began my descent down the stairway, intending to count the wooden steps but there were so many I soon lost count. I descended down to the next platform, and that's when I finally saw it.

Written in the sand, in huge letters, were the words, "I love you." The letters were facing the viewing platform, and all around the message were hundreds of footprints in the sand. It must have taken quite a bit of time and effort to carve out that heartfelt message. Who had written it, and for whom? Maybe it had been an engagement proposal?

My romance writer side was captivated, and soon I was imagining a heroine on the platform and a hero down on his knee. Of course she said "Yes," because who can resist love on the beach?